Why Veterans Can Fill Your Company’s Tech Skills Gap

A new Amazon initiative to train veterans for technical roles sheds light on an untapped talent pool with an important skill set.

The US Department of Labor recently partnered with Amazon to create an apprenticeship program that trains veterans for technical roles at the online giant, shedding light on how other companies can access the large, untapped veteran workforce to fill tech skills gaps.

Click here to read more about the Amazon and US Department of Labor collaboration published within the U.S. Veterans Magazine.

Welding Complex Offers More Vocational Opportunities (CA)

A dedication ceremony at Victor Valley College Friday celebrated both the revitalization of two of the college’s oldest buildings and the marriage of two vocational programs valuable to employers.

The new Automotive/Welding Vocational Complex addresses VVC’s 2015 Facilities Master Plan recommendation to provide the direly needed upgrades to the old auto and welding structures, which were built in 1970 and 1980, respectively.

Click here to read Charity Lindsey’s complete article on the collaboration and new facility posted on the VVDailtyPress.com website.

PA Mayor connects students with Rebuild initiative

Principal Darryl C. Overton presented Mayor Jim Kenney with a honorary alumni certificate and handmade key to the A. Randolph Career and Technical High School Friday morning during the mayor’s tour of the school.

Mayor Kenney spent the morning visiting different programs offered by the school, at 3101 Henry Ave., as part of an effort to connect students with future jobs through Rebuild.

Known as Rebuilding Community Infrastructure, Rebuild is an initiative launched by the Mayor’s office to help improve parks, libraries and recreation centers in the city. The $500 million program will be funded in part by the sugary beverage tax.

Click here to read Maya Earls’ complete article from The Philadelphia Tribune.  

CTE prepares student for careers, not jobs

Wylie High School junior Cody Carrigan’s automotive inspiration started in his own garage long before he stepped foot in Cisco College’s automotive technician classes. He said he tinkers with cars at home, often with his father. His grandfather also helped steer him toward the automotive industry.

When Carrigan steps into class, it’s more business-like, he said. “This is more like job training than what I do at home,” he said. “Here, we’re learning more of the process. Things like engine diagnosis. At home I’m doing this just for fun.”

Carrigan is one of many Abilene students involved in Career and Technical Education classes in Abilene. The classes not only fill a need for student but also for local employers who need workers.

Click here to read Timothy Chipp’s complete article from the Abilene Reporter News. 

Florida Virtual School model shows online learning can be engaging

Dive Brief:

  • The eSchool Media and Xirrus Innovate to Educate awards program has identified the Florida Virtual School as a community winner for its strategy engaging elementary students in the online learning environment.
  • According to eSchool News, the ClassTime model uses live video lessons to get students and teachers interacting online twice per week while students are expected to work independently with their parents three times per week.
  • Students can collaborate with each other and their teachers using discussion tools, online voting, chat boxes and breakout rooms, and FLVS elementary principal Sarah Sprinkel said every lesson begins with an engagement activity that helps develop relationships.

Click here to read the entire brief from EducationDIVE.

As Dust Settles from Presidential Transition, A Path for Perkins Emerges

After a contentious confirmation hearing and an unprecedented vote requiring Vice President Mike Pence to break a Senate tie, Betsy DeVos was confirmed as President Donald Trump’s Secretary of Education on February 7. In her first weeks on the job, Secretary DeVos reassured state education officials they should move forward with implementing the Every Students Succeeds Act (ESSA) as planned, despite moves from the 115th Congress to eliminate Obama-era regulations on ESSA accountability and teacher preparation. Barring further changes from the administration, state ESSA plans are due on either April 3 or September 18 this year.

Click here to read AdvanceCTE entire article on ‘Transition Update from the Trump Administration’. 

Smart cars require smarter workers

All automotive companies in the Greater Lima region may be experiencing a “skills gap,” but every company’s skills gap is different.

For Crown Equipment in New Bremen, it’s information technology.

“Think about where technology resides today that it didn’t 10, 15 years ago,” said vice president Randy Niekamp by phone from Crown’s global headquarters in New Bremen. “It’s in your car, it’s in your watch, it’s in our lift trucks. Those displays that you have in your car? Those displays are on fork lifts, too.”

Click here to read Amy Eddings’ article on Crown Equipment and other Ohio companies facing the skills gap from the LimaOhio.com website. 

7 Tips for Planning a Makerspace

An increasing number of K-12 schools are transforming classrooms, libraries or other spaces into Informal workshop environments where students can tinker or invent, and with good reason. According to The NMC/CoSN Horizon Report: 2016 K-12 Edition, “Makerspaces are also increasing student exposure to STEM subjects and technical disciplines. Learners are applying maker skills to address some of the world’s pressing challenges with innovative solutions.”

But how do makerspaces get started? THE Journal spoke with several experts, who shared their insights into the makerspace planning phase — not just designing or equipping the space itself but preparing the students and staff so that they’re able to make the best possible use of it.

Click here to read Leila Meyer’s complete article from The Journal. 

School districts partner with CVTC in Welding Academy

Cornell High School senior Garret Kralewski fired up an oxyacetylene torch and prepared to do some more cutting on a piece of metal when his instructor looked at the flame and gave him an important tip. “A little more oxygen, Garret,” said Chrystal Reidt, a Chippewa Valley Technical College Welding instructor.

 

Kralewski is one of a dozen students from Cornell, Cadott, Stanley-Boyd and Gilman high schools picking up basic instruction and finer points of welding during a Welding Academy held at Cadott High School through a cooperative agreement between CVTC and the partner school districts. But welding knowledge is not all the students are picking up.

Click here to read more about the Chippewa Valley Tech College’s (Wisconsin) Welding Program published in The Chippewa Herald. 

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