CTE in the News: Local school systems provide easy path to meet demand for trade jobs

by Marlys Mason | Originally posted on May 27, 2019 in The Owensboro Times | Click here to read the original article

Daviess County and Owensboro Public Schools know that not all students need a four-year, liberal arts degree to find success in the workplace. The leaders in both districts have collaborated to create a Community Campus, which offers high school students opportunities in industrial and other technical fields that can put them in high demand in the labor market upon graduation.

Local companies and factories are providing opportunities for technical students to pre-apprentice in order to help students become skilled workers, filling positions during worker shortages.

“Reigniting interest in technical careers is imperative due to the expected growth in these sectors and forecasted retirements,” said Stacy Edds-Ellis, Owensboro Community and Technical College’s Dean of Academic Affairs.

OPS Superintendent Nick Brake said that his mantra is that 14 is the new 12, meaning 12 years of education will not provide the necessary requirements for acquiring a job that will provide the income needed in the U.S.

“College is not for everyone, but students cannot be content with a high school diploma,” Brake said.

DCPS Superintendent Matt Robbins agrees and said he believes a district’s goal is to prepare students for success and “provide the keys to unlock the door to the future by ensuring all students are truly college and career ready.”

Click here to read the original article, which was posted on March 27, 2019 in The Owensboro Times

Leave a Reply

Up ↑