CTE in the news: Students in Tech Say Soft Skills and the Arts Set Them Up for Success

Originally posted by Emily Tate on June 12, 2019 on Edsurge.com | Click here to read the original post

WASHINGTON, D.C. — When Dolica Gopisetty was applying for summer internships earlier this year, employers kept telling her that what they valued most in potential hires was strong communication skills and a willingness to learn new things.

And when Nathan Wallace was transitioning from college to the workforce a few months ago, he noticed a similar trend. “A lot of employers are looking for a well-rounded individual with multiple skills, including the ability to communicate effectively,” he said, adding that a penchant for experimentation came up a lot, too.

Gopisetty and Wallace are both in highly technical fields. She’s pursuing an information technology degree, with a focus on cloud computing, at Virginia’s George Mason University, and he’s a recent graduate of Georgetown University’s master’s program in technology management. Yet despite these technical backgrounds, Gopisetty and Wallace, along with four other students speaking on a panel at the AWS Public Sector Summit in Washington, D.C. this week, praised their experiences in the arts and the importance of soft skills as key to setting them up for success in their respective fields.

Click here to read the original post, which was published on Edsurge.com on June 12

Lessons On Career & Technical Education From America’s Oldest Trade School

Originally posted by Frederick Hess on June 18, 2019 on Forbes.com | Click here to read the original post

The nation is suffused in enthusiastic talk about career and technical education. Policymakers ranging from President Trump to Joe Biden to Bernie Sanders have called for more schooling that can equip students for in-demand, middle-class jobs. Well, a lot of the discussion is driven by advocates, academics, and elected officials. It seems useful to ask those with a track record of actually doing this work what they think.

Enter Sarah Turner, the president of North Bennet Street School (NBSS), a 138-year-old trade school in Boston. The school enrolls students from age 18 to 70, with a mix of high school grads, veterans, and white-collar professionals. A Fulbright Fellow who has studied Dutch contemporary applied art, Turner comes to the trades as an artist—giving her an intriguing perspective on the whole thing.

Click here to read the original post, which written by Frederick Hess on June 18 for Forbes.com

How I Found My Passion Through CTE

Originally posted by Dioselina De La Cruz on February 19, 2019 on “Homeroom,” the official blog of the U.S. Department of Education | Click here to read the original post

It was during my freshman year of high school when I first realized that STEM was not the career pathway I wanted to pursue. While I understood the importance of a strong foundation in STEM fundamentals, my real passion was business.

My story starts my freshman year of high school in Pharr, a south Texas border town. I applied to a STEM school in my district which had a reputation for academic excellence. I was accepted, and my family was ecstatic. Being the youngest of six sisters in a family of humble migrant farm workers, I grew up in the fields, worked hard and believed in the opportunities a good education could bring.

Click here to read the original post, which was published on “Homeroom,” the official blog of the U.S. Department of Education, on February 19, 2019

Crawford County Career and Technical Center students sign on with employers

Originally published by Keith Gushard in the Meadville Tribune on June 4, 2019

Monday was Crawford County’s biggest signing day ever with 30 students inking letters of intent — but not for sports. The soon-to-be graduates from Crawford County Career and Technical Center’s various trades programs formally signed on with employers.

The school’s inaugural signing day ceremony Monday was the brainchild of Bonnie Stein, who coordinates the school’s cooperative education program.

Cooperative education combines school-based education with practical work experience, giving school credit for the job experience and paying the students at the same time. Senior year students are in the work force at jobs based on their trades’ career path.

“Students get recognized at the high schools for scholarships and going on to play sports, why don’t we honor the students going on in the work force full time?” Stein said following the ceremonies. “These 30 all were offered full-time work. We get calls all the time ‘Do you have a student prepared to go into the work force?'”

Click here to read the original article article in its entirety.

Las Vegas School Connects Disadvantaged Kids to Careers

By Devin Bodkin | Originally posted 6/4/19 in Idaho Ed News

LAS VEGAS, Nev. — Darlin Delgado’s past inspires her pursuit to help students in poverty.

“I was one of them,” said Delgado, principal at Las Vegas-based East Career and Technical Academy.

Delgado’s family migrated from war-stricken El Salvador to Sin City when she was a child. The search for a better life wasn’t easy. She didn’t speak English, and her father’s job as a dishwasher at the Dunes Hotel didn’t pay much.

An attentive teacher eventually reached out to the young girl, stressed the value of an education and gave her some helpful resources.

That gave Delgado a purpose, she said, and inspired her to one day become a teacher.

Today, connecting disadvantaged students to careers is a hallmark of Delgado’s school, which operates in one of Las Vegas’s poorest areas.

Despite the challenge, the academy’s emphasis on career-technical education is helping students in poverty surpass state averages in areas where they typically fall behind.

Click here to read the original article in its entirety, which was originally published on June 4, 2019 On IdEdNews.org.

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