Tri-County gets 10k grant from Bayer to fund STEM project

Originally posted by Heather VanDenmark for the Herald Journal on July 27, 2019 | Click here to read the original post

REMINGTON — Employees from Bayer Crop Science of Remington recommended Tri-County Intermediate School receive a $10,000 grant from the Bayer Fund’s 2019 site grant initiative.

The funds from the grant will be used to improve the school’s hydroponics program, which offers students engaging experiences that will develop 21st century skills.

According to TCI Principal Brian Hagan, the funds will be used to purchase two vertical hydroponic systems. This will provide students the opportunity to learn a different type of hydroponics system for crops such as peppers and tomatoes.

This article was originally posted on July 27, 2019 for the Herald Journal. Click here to read the original post in its entirety.

At career camps, middle school students get hands-on experience with CPR

Originally posted by Rachel Alexander on July 9, 2019 for the Salem Reporter | Click here to read the original post

In mid-July, Sprague High School appears mostly deserted.

But one basement classroom teemed with excitement Monday as 20 students practiced chest compression, hooked up defibrillators and tried to listen to heart monitors over the din of people screaming, “I have an emergency!”

It was the first day of health services camp, a week-long program for Salem-Keizer middle school students taught by Sprague High School teachers.

At the start of camp, “most of them didn’t know each other. You could’ve heard a pin drop,” said health and sports medicine teacher Kimo Mahi.

Three hours later, the teens were working together to save the lives of their dummies while teasing each other.

Click here to read the original post, which was written by Rachel Alexander for the Salem Reporter on July 9, 2019

Career & technical education programs get funding boost to help fill need for workers

Originally posted on July 13, 2019 for abc27.com | Click here to read the original post

LANCASTER, Pa. (WHTM) – This year’s state budget includes millions of dollars of support for career and technical education programs. The goal is to help fill the high demand for skilled workers.

Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology is getting four million dollars extra this year, so it could expand its programs and train more students.

“If we had 1,400 employers with over 4,000 jobs seeking our close to 400 graduates, obviously most of them didn’t get the human resources they need, which means they can’t do the business that they need to do,” said Dr. William Griscom, the president of Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology.

Several chamber of commerces in Pennsylvania say the need for candidates with career and technical education is higher than ever.

“When you have an institution that has been turning away thousands of enrollees because they just didn’t have the room or the space, and at the same time you’re turning away thousands of employers who say, ‘I need welders for this and I need this’…to be able to finally be able to put our money where our mouth is,” said Sen. Scott Martin.

Click here to read the original article, which was posted on July 13, 2019 for abc27.com

How Hydroponic School Gardens Can Cultivate Food Justice, Year-Round

Originally posted by Robin Lloyd on July 7, 2019 for KUOW.org | Click here to read the original post

After a full day of school a few weeks ago, 12-year-old Rose Quigley donned gloves and quickly picked bunches of fresh lettuce, Swiss chard, kale, mint and oregano. But she didn’t have to leave her school in Brooklyn, N.Y., or even go outdoors to do it.

Quigley is one of dozens of students at Brownsville Collaborative Middle School who in the past year built a high-tech, high-yield farm inside a third-floor classroom. They decided what to grow, then planted seeds and harvested dozens of pounds of produce weekly.

The vegetables never stop coming because the crops are grown hydroponically — indoors, on floor-to-ceiling shelves that hold seedlings and plants sprouting from fiber plugs stuck in trays, each fed by nutrient-enriched water and lit by LED lamps. The students provide weekly produce for their cafeteria’s salad bar and other dishes.

Later that same day, for the first time, Quigley and several of her schoolmates also sold some of their harvest — at a discount from market rates — to community members. It’s part of a new weekly “food box” service set up in the school’s foyer. Each of 34 customers receive an allotment of fresh produce intended to feed two people for a week. Three students, paid as interns, used digital tablets to process orders, while peers handed out free samples of a pasta salad featuring produce from the farm.

Quigley’s passion for farming stems from Teens for Food Justice, a 6-year-old nonprofit organization that has worked with community partners to train students at Brownsville Collaborative and two other schools in low-income neighborhoods in New York City to become savvy urban farmers and consumers.

Originally posted by Robin Lloyd on July 7, 2019 for KUOW.org | Click here to read the original post

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