CTE in the News: Local school systems provide easy path to meet demand for trade jobs

by Marlys Mason | Originally posted on May 27, 2019 in The Owensboro Times | Click here to read the original article

Daviess County and Owensboro Public Schools know that not all students need a four-year, liberal arts degree to find success in the workplace. The leaders in both districts have collaborated to create a Community Campus, which offers high school students opportunities in industrial and other technical fields that can put them in high demand in the labor market upon graduation.

Local companies and factories are providing opportunities for technical students to pre-apprentice in order to help students become skilled workers, filling positions during worker shortages.

“Reigniting interest in technical careers is imperative due to the expected growth in these sectors and forecasted retirements,” said Stacy Edds-Ellis, Owensboro Community and Technical College’s Dean of Academic Affairs.

OPS Superintendent Nick Brake said that his mantra is that 14 is the new 12, meaning 12 years of education will not provide the necessary requirements for acquiring a job that will provide the income needed in the U.S.

“College is not for everyone, but students cannot be content with a high school diploma,” Brake said.

DCPS Superintendent Matt Robbins agrees and said he believes a district’s goal is to prepare students for success and “provide the keys to unlock the door to the future by ensuring all students are truly college and career ready.”

Click here to read the original article, which was posted on March 27, 2019 in The Owensboro Times

State Funding Enables Community Programs to Give MN High School Students Valuable Job Training Opportunities

In January, five community programs throughout the state of Minnesota were awarded $95,000 in grant funding to develop and implement paid learning opportunities for 16- and 17-year-old students. The funding came from the Youth Skills Training Program at the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry (YST@DLI), which was created in 2017 with funding from the Minnesota legislature (Minn. Stat. 175.46) to help communities create local programs that give high school students exposure, training, certifications and paid work experience in five high-demand, high-growth industries: advanced manufacturing, agriculture, automotive, health care and information technology.

To be successful, local programs rely on connections between industry and education to ensure student experience is meaningful and relevant. Five pilot programs were awarded grants last year to develop paid learning opportunities in manufacturing, health care and information technology; this year, programs in Elk River, Hutchinson, Marshall, Red Wing, St. Paul, White Bear Lake and Winona will enable students in 27 school districts to get paid work experience in manufacturing and health care.

“Employers throughout the state are reporting an increasing number of unfilled positions in high-paying jobs that require a certification or two-year degree and describe significant challenges to find qualified and trainable employees to fill these skilled positions,” said Rich Wessels, Youth Skills Training Program Senior Project Manager. “The YST program is a way to address this issue by connecting industry with education to provide students with opportunities to learn about and gain hands-on experience.”

Click here to read the complete article, which was originally published in April 2019 on ACTE’s IndustryConnect blog.

Coding Grant Helps North Carolina Students Explore In-Demand Career Options

In Beaufort County, North Carolina, programmers are in high demand. Job forecasts conducted by local workforce development boards show a 94% growth rate for programming jobs among 27 eastern NC counties from 2016-2021; programming skills, along with tooling, machine and drone operation skills, have been among the most in-demand job skills listed by local and regional manufacturing businesses for three straight years.

When Beaufort County Schools (BCS) saw an opportunity to fund an extension of the district’s coding program into K-12 classrooms across the district and at the local community college, administrators didn’t hesitate to apply. Last fall, North Carolina Superintendent Mark Johnson announced that 16 school districts, including Beaufort County, had been awarded grants totaling $800,000 through the second round of the Coding and Mobile App Development Grant Program, which was launched in 2017 with funding from the state’s general assembly.

“BCS’s strategic STEM plan, the use of Digital Learning Competencies training, and the injection of real-world needs provided through our advisory process and partnerships with our local industries produced the perfect conditions for synergy around STEM including coding,” said Wendy Petteway, BCS Career and Technical Education Department Director. “We needed to expand beyond where we were and extend coding into K-12 across the district and at Beaufort County Community College, and the coding grant has provided the opportunity for that expansion.”

Click here to read the entire article, which was originally posted in ACTE’s IndustryConnect blog in March 2019.

Indiana High School Prepares Students for Success in Pharmacy Technology

It’s no secret: Healthcare workers are in high demand. Ten of the top 20 fastest-growing occupations nationwide are in health care; certified nursing assistants, physical therapists and nurse practitioners are among the most sought-after (United States Department of Labor, 2018).

Across the country, CTE instructors are doing great things in the classroom to prepare students for in-demand careers. They’re collaborating with industry and workforce development representatives; they’re securing certification opportunities; and they’re providing unique hands-on learning experiences that engage today’s youth in high-demand, high-skilled, high-paying jobs. The pharmacy technician program at the Area 31 Career Center at Ben Davis High School in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one such example.

Click here to read the entire article, whicih was originally published on ACTE’s PAGES blog in January 2019.

State CTE Policies Hard at Work: Florida College Starts Mechatronics and Electromechanical Technician training program with job growth grant

For Career & Technical Education programs to succeed, collaboration between business and education must occur. As President & CEO of Realityworks, Inc, I’ve seen firsthand the impact of successful partnerships: Not only do students learn valuable academic, technical and employability skills, but they do so through relevant, workforce-driven programs that provide valuable real-world, hands-on learning opportunities.

State CTE policies are a key part of successful industry-education collaboration. In previous blog posts, I explored the welding and manufacturing program that Michigan educators worked with industry representatives to expand thanks to funds from House Bill 4313, and the health occupations program that Oregon educators worked with local businesses to develop with funds from a career-readiness grant. This month, we’re looking at St. Petersburg College (SPC) in Pinellas County, Florida. In April 2018, the four-year state college was awarded a $1,596,858 grant to start a Mechatronics and Electromechanical Technician training program.

Read the full article from ACTE’s Industry Connect November 2018 blog here.

Harper working to tackle the skills gap

The “skills gap” has become a popular buzzword, and for good reason. In 2016, nearly half of U.S. employers reported that they faced difficulty filling jobs due to lack of available talent. Both nursing and manufacturing in particular face a critical shortage of skilled workers, a trend driven largely by the aging baby boomer generation.

Just look at the stats:

  • By 2024, there will be more than 1 million job openings in the U.S. for nurses.
  • Over the next decade, 3.5 million manufacturing jobs will need to be filled nationwide.
  • And in Illinois, middle-skill jobs overall (requiring education beyond high school but not a four-year degree) account for 53 percent of the state’s labor market, but only 42 percent of the state’s workers are trained to the middle-skill level, according to the National Skills Coalition.

 

Click here to read the entire article published on the Harper College website. 

Manufacturing today offers a new world of opportunity

It’s National Manufacturing Month, and that makes October a great opportunity to take a fresh look at the industry’s role in our nation, our state and right here in Hopkins County. Its opportunities are real and growing, and they might be a good bit different than you imagine when you think about the industry.

 

For example, modern manufacturing is evolving into a more diverse sector, as much about creating things as producing them. The old perceptions of grimy plants, tedious manual tasks and dangerous machines are giving way as advanced technologies such as 3D printing, computer-aided design and robotics play a larger and larger role in bringing about our products.

 

“New jobs in modern manufacturing extend beyond shop floors and laboratories into offices, state-of-the-art tech centers and even your living room,” write the National Association of Manufacturers and Manufacturing Institute at their recruitment website, CreatorsWanted.org. “Everything that is made needs smart thinkers and doers to invent, market, distribute and maintain revolutionary products.”

Click here to read Ray Hagerman’s complete article published on The Messenger website.

Workplace Learning Is Central To Closing Skills Gap

Workplace learning that bridges the gap between employee skills and company needs is critical to every firm. Knowing what talents workers bring to the table currently and predicting which skills a company will need to succeed in the future is tricky. Experts say focus on reducing the impact of automation. How? Help workers develop soft skills such as communication, adaptability and critical thinking.

Key to closing the skills gap is creating a culture of workplace learning, says Kelly Palmer, co-author with David Blake of “The Expertise Economy: How the Smartest Companies Use Learning to Engage, Compete, and Succeed.”

“The skills gap is a very real thing, and if (leaders) are not encouraging employees to learn, it might not happen,” Palmer told IBD. “Simply sending employees to class alone is not working.”

Click here to read Adelia Cellini Linecker’s compete article published on Investor’s Business Daily.

How transformative tech can address the skills gap within construction

Technology is evolving at a rapid pace, with new devices and products being introduced on a daily basis to help enhance the workplace. It could be argued that the construction industry has been slow in bringing this in, and is yet to undergo a major transformation.

Firms now find themselves in a difficult position as they compete to an international completion, and having to deal with more complex projects and concepts. The threat of skill gap has also meant many companies lag behind compared to any other industry. This leads to many projects having a number of complications and delays which can be avoidable in this day and age.

Alongside this, the industry also suffers from an ageing workforce which may not be used to modern technological advances, resulting in a major skills gap amongst many companies in the industry. Thus, there is the incentive to retrain workers to be able to operate new technology and attract young people who are technological natives into the industry.

The industry needs to embrace transformative technologies in order to cater for the changing sector and to address the skills gap. This transformative technology includes hardware and software that are designed to bring about positive and more reliable changes for the benefit of workers.

Click here to read Tevor Horsley’s complete article published on the Construction Global website. 

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