Las Vegas School Connects Disadvantaged Kids to Careers

By Devin Bodkin | Originally posted 6/4/19 in Idaho Ed News

LAS VEGAS, Nev. — Darlin Delgado’s past inspires her pursuit to help students in poverty.

“I was one of them,” said Delgado, principal at Las Vegas-based East Career and Technical Academy.

Delgado’s family migrated from war-stricken El Salvador to Sin City when she was a child. The search for a better life wasn’t easy. She didn’t speak English, and her father’s job as a dishwasher at the Dunes Hotel didn’t pay much.

An attentive teacher eventually reached out to the young girl, stressed the value of an education and gave her some helpful resources.

That gave Delgado a purpose, she said, and inspired her to one day become a teacher.

Today, connecting disadvantaged students to careers is a hallmark of Delgado’s school, which operates in one of Las Vegas’s poorest areas.

Despite the challenge, the academy’s emphasis on career-technical education is helping students in poverty surpass state averages in areas where they typically fall behind.

Click here to read the original article in its entirety, which was originally published on June 4, 2019 On IdEdNews.org.

CTE in the News: Gilbert schools give students job opportunities

By Tom Blodgett | Originally posted on May 29, 2019 in The Gilbert Community News | Click here to read the original article

From freshman orientation, Parker Ferguson took an interest in the offerings of the agriscience and engineering class at Highland High School. Three years later, the 17-year-old junior has stuck with it, learned to weld, earned two internships and sold pieces he made at the school and at the county fair.“I like the freedom and that I get to work with my hands,” Ferguson said. “Mr. [Curtis] Willems teaches us how to use all of the tools and the proper safety procedures, and then he sets us loose, and we get to build whatever projects we want.”

Ferguson plans to pursue a precision manufacturing degree after high school and use that to get a job in computer numerical control manufacturing. Such a path makes Ferguson an example of the value of career and technical education, or CTE, offered in Gilbert’s high schools.

Click here to read the original article, which was posted on May 29 in the Gilbert Community News.

CTE in the News: Local school systems provide easy path to meet demand for trade jobs

by Marlys Mason | Originally posted on May 27, 2019 in The Owensboro Times | Click here to read the original article

Daviess County and Owensboro Public Schools know that not all students need a four-year, liberal arts degree to find success in the workplace. The leaders in both districts have collaborated to create a Community Campus, which offers high school students opportunities in industrial and other technical fields that can put them in high demand in the labor market upon graduation.

Local companies and factories are providing opportunities for technical students to pre-apprentice in order to help students become skilled workers, filling positions during worker shortages.

“Reigniting interest in technical careers is imperative due to the expected growth in these sectors and forecasted retirements,” said Stacy Edds-Ellis, Owensboro Community and Technical College’s Dean of Academic Affairs.

OPS Superintendent Nick Brake said that his mantra is that 14 is the new 12, meaning 12 years of education will not provide the necessary requirements for acquiring a job that will provide the income needed in the U.S.

“College is not for everyone, but students cannot be content with a high school diploma,” Brake said.

DCPS Superintendent Matt Robbins agrees and said he believes a district’s goal is to prepare students for success and “provide the keys to unlock the door to the future by ensuring all students are truly college and career ready.”

Click here to read the original article, which was posted on March 27, 2019 in The Owensboro Times

State Funding Enables Community Programs to Give MN High School Students Valuable Job Training Opportunities

In January, five community programs throughout the state of Minnesota were awarded $95,000 in grant funding to develop and implement paid learning opportunities for 16- and 17-year-old students. The funding came from the Youth Skills Training Program at the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry (YST@DLI), which was created in 2017 with funding from the Minnesota legislature (Minn. Stat. 175.46) to help communities create local programs that give high school students exposure, training, certifications and paid work experience in five high-demand, high-growth industries: advanced manufacturing, agriculture, automotive, health care and information technology.

To be successful, local programs rely on connections between industry and education to ensure student experience is meaningful and relevant. Five pilot programs were awarded grants last year to develop paid learning opportunities in manufacturing, health care and information technology; this year, programs in Elk River, Hutchinson, Marshall, Red Wing, St. Paul, White Bear Lake and Winona will enable students in 27 school districts to get paid work experience in manufacturing and health care.

“Employers throughout the state are reporting an increasing number of unfilled positions in high-paying jobs that require a certification or two-year degree and describe significant challenges to find qualified and trainable employees to fill these skilled positions,” said Rich Wessels, Youth Skills Training Program Senior Project Manager. “The YST program is a way to address this issue by connecting industry with education to provide students with opportunities to learn about and gain hands-on experience.”

Click here to read the complete article, which was originally published in April 2019 on ACTE’s IndustryConnect blog.

Coding Grant Helps North Carolina Students Explore In-Demand Career Options

In Beaufort County, North Carolina, programmers are in high demand. Job forecasts conducted by local workforce development boards show a 94% growth rate for programming jobs among 27 eastern NC counties from 2016-2021; programming skills, along with tooling, machine and drone operation skills, have been among the most in-demand job skills listed by local and regional manufacturing businesses for three straight years.

When Beaufort County Schools (BCS) saw an opportunity to fund an extension of the district’s coding program into K-12 classrooms across the district and at the local community college, administrators didn’t hesitate to apply. Last fall, North Carolina Superintendent Mark Johnson announced that 16 school districts, including Beaufort County, had been awarded grants totaling $800,000 through the second round of the Coding and Mobile App Development Grant Program, which was launched in 2017 with funding from the state’s general assembly.

“BCS’s strategic STEM plan, the use of Digital Learning Competencies training, and the injection of real-world needs provided through our advisory process and partnerships with our local industries produced the perfect conditions for synergy around STEM including coding,” said Wendy Petteway, BCS Career and Technical Education Department Director. “We needed to expand beyond where we were and extend coding into K-12 across the district and at Beaufort County Community College, and the coding grant has provided the opportunity for that expansion.”

Click here to read the entire article, which was originally posted in ACTE’s IndustryConnect blog in March 2019.

Indiana High School Prepares Students for Success in Pharmacy Technology

It’s no secret: Healthcare workers are in high demand. Ten of the top 20 fastest-growing occupations nationwide are in health care; certified nursing assistants, physical therapists and nurse practitioners are among the most sought-after (United States Department of Labor, 2018).

Across the country, CTE instructors are doing great things in the classroom to prepare students for in-demand careers. They’re collaborating with industry and workforce development representatives; they’re securing certification opportunities; and they’re providing unique hands-on learning experiences that engage today’s youth in high-demand, high-skilled, high-paying jobs. The pharmacy technician program at the Area 31 Career Center at Ben Davis High School in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one such example.

Click here to read the entire article, whicih was originally published on ACTE’s PAGES blog in January 2019.

State CTE Policies Hard at Work: Florida College Starts Mechatronics and Electromechanical Technician training program with job growth grant

For Career & Technical Education programs to succeed, collaboration between business and education must occur. As President & CEO of Realityworks, Inc, I’ve seen firsthand the impact of successful partnerships: Not only do students learn valuable academic, technical and employability skills, but they do so through relevant, workforce-driven programs that provide valuable real-world, hands-on learning opportunities.

State CTE policies are a key part of successful industry-education collaboration. In previous blog posts, I explored the welding and manufacturing program that Michigan educators worked with industry representatives to expand thanks to funds from House Bill 4313, and the health occupations program that Oregon educators worked with local businesses to develop with funds from a career-readiness grant. This month, we’re looking at St. Petersburg College (SPC) in Pinellas County, Florida. In April 2018, the four-year state college was awarded a $1,596,858 grant to start a Mechatronics and Electromechanical Technician training program.

Read the full article from ACTE’s Industry Connect November 2018 blog here.

Harper working to tackle the skills gap

The “skills gap” has become a popular buzzword, and for good reason. In 2016, nearly half of U.S. employers reported that they faced difficulty filling jobs due to lack of available talent. Both nursing and manufacturing in particular face a critical shortage of skilled workers, a trend driven largely by the aging baby boomer generation.

Just look at the stats:

  • By 2024, there will be more than 1 million job openings in the U.S. for nurses.
  • Over the next decade, 3.5 million manufacturing jobs will need to be filled nationwide.
  • And in Illinois, middle-skill jobs overall (requiring education beyond high school but not a four-year degree) account for 53 percent of the state’s labor market, but only 42 percent of the state’s workers are trained to the middle-skill level, according to the National Skills Coalition.

 

Click here to read the entire article published on the Harper College website. 

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